The Ins and Outs of Donating to a Museum

As advisors in art collection management, we often get inquiries from people who have inherited a work of art or a collection and are interested in donating to a museum. Many assume that most museums will be glad to accept a given art work to their collection. Unfortunately, it is not as easy as one would think. First of all, the art work or collection in question needs to fit into the museum’s mission. Even if it does fit the mission, the museum may already have a number of similar works. For example, we recently inventoried and advised on a large collection of Mexican folk art that had been acquired  by an recognized academic in the field. However, many of the museums with a mission congruent with her folk art collection, already had many similar works and were very selective in accepting objects from the collection. The reality is, that there are costs to accepting an artwork or a collection – costs to store, costs to conserve and maintain, and costs to research.  Museums are more likely to accept if the artwork or collection fills a gap in a collection, or if the artwork fits into a category that the museum is looking to expand.

In the case of antiquities or cultural property, curators may be concerned about the authenticity of an object, or if that object may have been acquired in violation of international cultural patrimony laws. If the owner does not have a solid provenance (history of ownership) for the artifact, documentation that it was acquired from a respected and known auction house, gallery or collector, it can be viewed as a red flag by curators about its authenticity or the legality of its acquisition. For more on the ins and outs of donation, click on the link below.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/11/your-money/even-for-philanthropists-museums-can-make-art-a-tough-give.html?auth=link-dismiss-google1tap

 

 

 

 

 

Appraising in a Pandemic

Over the past month, our firm has received a number of inquiries for appraisal services and sales advisory.  Like so many right now, Thompson & Martinez and the appraisal profession has had to adapt to the “new normal” of working from home. Appraisers typically prefer to do an in-person inspection of a property or collection for any given project. Occasionally if the property or collection is outside of our region, we will work with another appraiser in that region to “be our eyes” as the inspector.  Now, because of shelter-in-place policies around the country, appraisers are, by and large, unable to inspect in person. However, governors of the three accreditation societies (ASA, AAA, ISA), have advised appraisers that depending on the appraisal purpose and property, inspections can be carried out “remotely” with clients providing information on their property such as artist, medium, date, dimensions, signatures, and taking high quality and detailed digital photographs. Please click on Consultation Request  to begin this process. 

Wishing you health in this uncertain time. 

 

Lydia Thompson on the challenges and opportunities of the Chinese art market

Recently Lydia Thompson, a principal of Thompson & Martinez Fine Art Appraisals, and expert on Chinese art taught a webinar The Chinese Art Market: Challenges and Opportunities on behalf of the American Society of Appraisers. Drawing on more than 25 years in the Chinese art field, Dr. Thompson provided historical context for the tremendous growth of the market in the past 20 years, the pitfalls of appraising Chinese art as well as the opportunities. To learn more about the topics addressed, please visit: Q&A with Dr. Lydia Thompson